Picture Frames, Picture Framing and Picture Framers' Blog

Welcome to our weblog about picture framers, picture frames and picture framing. It is published and maintained with the goal to share information, knowledge, tips, ideas and opinions about this industry. All posts are grouped in the sections listed below. For help with orders, please visit our Store Help and FAQS page, or use our Contact page.

A Brief Guide of Window Mats and Their Openings

A Brief Tour of Window Mats and Their Openings. In this blog we will try to shed some light on Window Mats and Their Openings, with a particular focus to their external and internal sizing. A window mat ( Customers often call them edges, cardboards, surrounds, masks, etc ) or a window mount, as our English brethren would call one is that white or coloured cardboard that framers often put around images and inside picture frames. Broadly speaking, window mats are placed over and around images for several important reasons. The two main ones would be: a) the thickness of the mat ( around 1.2 or more millimetres) helps to keep the glass away from touching or rubbing the art and, b) the sides of the window mat distance the image, or art, from  the frame, this facilitates a better perception and appreciation of the art away from the visual distraction of the adjacent wood frame ... 

 
What’s inside a picture frame?

This is one of the questions we get asked fairly frequently.  The wording of the question can change frocross-section-of-picture-frame-componentsm person to person but Customers want to know the same thing.  And this is because they are curious of the components of a frame and the  names of the parts of  a picture frame.  We may get asked:“What do you put at the back?” , or: “What will you put my picture on?” and even: “Will you make something so that my picture won’t fall off?”, and so on and so forth. The reason this question gets asked is because people know that a thin piece of paper like a poster can’t hold up by itself and wonder what and how it is being held up or supported inside the frame.But what and how does this is hidden, not visible, and here’s this post to throw some light on the subject, so to speak.  Now, and because everyone asks the same answer differently we thought an illustrated exploded view, shown below,  would help to answer this rather technical question.  Referring to the schematic diagramme most  ...